Private Delhi Day Tour

Private Day Trip  

Delhi must see tour

The tour starts with pick up from your hotel anywhere in Delhi. Our driver will report at your hotel at agreed time and the tour will start from there. You will be driven in a private car exclusively just for you by experienced chauffeur.

Enjoy a private full-day tour of Delhi, and discover the city with a professional English-speaking guide. Learn more about the city’s rich history, as you visit stunning Mughal architecture, and landmarks of love, empire, and religion.

About this activity – Duration 8 hours
Printed or mobile voucher accepted – Instant confirmation
Live Guide – Spanish, English, French, German, Hindi, Russian

 

Red Fort

Red Fort is a historic fort in the city of Delhi in India. It was the main residence of the emperors of the Mughal dynasty for nearly 200 years, until 1856. It is located in the center of Delhi and houses a number of museums. In addition to accommodating the emperors and their households, it was the ceremonial and political center of the Mughal state and the setting for events critically impacting the region.[2]

Constructed in 1639 by the fifth Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan as the palace of his fortified capital Shahjahanabad, the Red Fort is named for its massive enclosing walls of red sandstone and is adjacent to the older Salimgarh Fort, built by Islam Shah Suri in 1546 AD. The imperial apartments consist of a row of pavilions, connected by a water channel known as the Stream of Paradise (Nahr-i-Bihisht). The fort complex is considered to represent the zenith of Mughal creativity under Shah Jahan,[citation needed] and although the palace was planned according to Islamic prototypes, each pavilion contains architectural elements typical of Mughal buildings that reflect a fusion of Timurid and Persian traditions. The Red Fort’s innovative architectural style, including its garden design, influenced later buildings and gardens in Delhi, Rajasthan, Punjab, Kashmir, Braj, Rohilkhand and elsewhere.

Jama Masjid

Jama Masjid (جَامع مَسجد‬), also spelled Jame MosqueJami MasjidJameh MosqueJamia Masjid, or Jomeh Mosque, refers to the main mosque, of a town, city, area or village, which hosts the special Friday noon prayers and, in case there is no allocated open space (Musallah or Eidgah) available or nearby, the Eid prayers. These are sometimes called Congregational mosques or Friday mosques. The term “Jama Masjid” or “Jame Masjid” comes from Persian Masjed-e Jame (مسجد جامع‬), from Arabic: مَسْجِد جَامِع‎, translit. Masjid Jāmi‘, meaning “congregational mosque” (in Arabic, the term is simplified to “جَامِع Jāmi‘“). In non-Arab Muslim nations, the word jāmi‘ (“that which gathers, congregates or assembles”) is often, though erroneously, conflated with another word from the same root, jumu‘ah (Arabic: جُمُعَة‎ “assembly, gathering”), a term which is used for the Friday noon prayers (Arabic: صَلَاة الْجُمُعَة‎, translit. Ṣalāṫ al-Jumu‘ah literally “prayer of assembly”) and the day itself (Arabic: يَوْم الْجُمُعَة‎, translit. Yawm al-Jumu‘ah literally “Day of Assembly”). This is due to the fact that the Friday prayers (or Jumu’ah prayers), which require congregations, are only held in congregational mosques, usually the main mosque or central mosque, and hence they are also sometimes known as Friday mosques.

 

India Gate

The India Gate भारत द्वार(originally called the All India War Memorial) is a war memorial located astride the Rajpath, on the eastern edge of the “ceremonial axis” of New Delhi, India, formerly called Kingsway.

India Gate is a memorial to 82,000 soldiers of the British Indian Army who died in the period 1914–21 in the First World War, in France, Flanders, Mesopotamia, Persia, East Africa, Gallipoli and elsewhere in the Near and the Far East, and the Third Anglo-Afghan War. 13,300 servicemen’s names, including some soldiers and officers from the United Kingdom, are inscribed on the gate. The India Gate, even though a war memorial, evokes the architectural style of the triumphal arch like the Arch of Constantine, outside the Colosseum in Rome, and is often compared to the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, and the Gateway of India in Mumbai. It was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

In 1972, following the Bangladesh Liberation war, a small simple structure, consisting of a black marble plinth, with a reversed rifle, capped by a war helmet, bounded by four eternal flames, was built beneath the soaring Memorial Archway. This structure, called Amar Jawan Jyoti, or the Flame of the Immortal Soldier, since 1971 has served as India’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. India Gate is counted among the largest war memorials in India.

 

President House ( Rashtrapati Bhavan )

The Rashtrapati Bhavan (About this soundpronunciation (help·info), “rásh-tra-pa-ti bha-van” ; Presidential Residence” previously “Viceroy’s House”) is the official home of the president located at the Western end of Rajpath in New Delhi, India. Rashtrapati Bhavan may refer to only the 340-room main building that has the president’s official residence, including reception halls, guest rooms and offices, also called the mansion; it may also refer to the entire 130-hectare (320 acre) Presidential Estate that additionally includes huge presidential gardens (Mughal Gardens), large open spaces, residences of bodyguards and staff, stables, other offices and utilities within its perimeter walls. In terms of area, it is the largest residence of any head of state in the world.

Humayun’s Tomb

Humayun’s tomb (Maqbaer-e-Humayun) is the tomb of the Mughal Emperor Humayun in Delhi, India. The tomb was commissioned by Humayun’s first wife and chief consort, Empress Bega Begum (also known as Haji Begum) in 1569-70, and designed by Mirak Mirza Ghiyas and his son, Sayyid Muhammad,[8] Persian architects chosen by her. It was the first garden-tomb on the Indian subcontinent, and is located in Nizamuddin East, Delhi, India, close to the Dina-panah Citadel, also known as Purana Qila (Old Fort), that Humayun founded in 1533. It was also the first structure to use red sandstone at such a scale. The tomb was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1993, and since then has undergone extensive restoration work, which is complete. Besides the main tomb enclosure of Humayun, several smaller monuments dot the pathway leading up to it, from the main entrance in the West, including one that even pre-dates the main tomb itself, by twenty years; it is the tomb complex of Isa Khan Niyazi, an Afghan noble in Sher Shah Suri’s court of the Suri dynasty, who fought against the Mughals, constructed in 1547 CE.

 

Qutb Minar

The Qutub Minar, also spelled as Qutab Minar, or Qutb Minar, is the tallest minaret in the world made up of bricks. The minaret forms a part of the Qutab complex, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in the Mehrauli area of Delhi, India. Qutub Minar is a 73-metre (239.5 feet) tall tapering tower of five storeys, with a 14.3 metres (47 feet) base diameter, reducing to 2.7 metres (9 feet) at the top of the peak. It contains a spiral staircase of 379 steps.Its design is thought to have been based on the Minaret of Jam, in western Afghanistan.

Qutab-Ud-Din-Aibak, founder of the Delhi Sultanate, started construction of the Qutub Minar’s first storey around 1192. In 1220, Aibak’s successor and son-in-law Shamsuddin Iltutmish completed a further three storeys. In 1369, a lightning strike destroyed the top storey. Firoz Shah Tughlaq replaced the damaged storey, and added one more. Sher Shah Suri also added an entrance to this tower while he was ruling and Humayun was in exile.

 

Gandhi Smriti

Gandhi Smriti formerly known as Birla House or Birla Bhavan, is a museum dedicated to Mahatma Gandhi, situated on Tees January Road, formerly Albuquerque Road, in New Delhi, India. It is the location where Mahatma Gandhi spent the last 144 days of his life and was assassinated on 30 January 1948. It was originally the house of the Indian business tycoons, the Birla family. It is now also home to the Eternal Gandhi Multimedia Museum, which was established in 2005. 

 

Gurudwara Bangla Sahib Or SIS Ganj Sahib Gurudwara

Gurudwara Bangla Sahib (About this soundlisten) is one of the most prominent Sikh gurdwara, or Sikh house of worship, in Delhi, India and known for its association with the eighth Sikh Guru, Guru Har Krishan, as well as the pool inside its complex, known as the “Sarovar.” It was first built as a small shrine by Sikh General Sardar Bhagel Singh in 1783, who supervised the construction of nine Sikh shrines in Delhi in the same year, during the reign of Mughal Emperor, Shah Alam II.

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